USDA wants more stuff in your fuel

Washington, D.C., May 15, 2020 – U.S. Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Stephen Censky today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture launched an online portal to begin accepting applications for Higher Blends Infrastructure Incentive Program (HBIIP) grants.

USDA plans to make available up to $100 million in competitive grants for activities designed to expand the sale and availability of ethanol and biodiesel fuels.

“As the coronavirus response continues, America’s energy independence has proven critical to our economic security now more than ever,” Deputy Secretary Censky said.

Continue reading “USDA wants more stuff in your fuel”

DHS, USDA move to protect American farmers and ensure continued flow of America’s food supply

The Department of Homeland Security, with the support of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), has announced a temporary final rule to change certain H-2A requirements to help U.S. agricultural employers avoid disruptions in lawful agricultural-related employment, protect the nation’s food supply chain, and lessen impacts from the coronavirus (COVID-19) public health emergency.

These temporary flexibilities will not weaken or eliminate protections for U.S. workers.

Continue reading “DHS, USDA move to protect American farmers and ensure continued flow of America’s food supply”

USDA Helps Cotton Producers Maintain, Expand Domestic Market

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced at the 66th Annual Mid-South Farm and Gin Show the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is taking action to assist cotton producers through a Cotton Ginning Cost Share (CGCS) program in order to expand and maintain the domestic marketing of cotton.

U.S. Department of Agriculture logo(MEMPHIS, TN, March 3, 2018) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced at the 66th Annual Mid-South Farm and Gin Show the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is taking action to assist cotton producers through a Cotton Ginning Cost Share (CGCS) program in order to expand and maintain the domestic marketing of cotton.

“America’s cotton producers have now faced four years of financial stress, just like the rest of our major commodities, but with a weaker safety net,” Perdue said. “In particular, cotton producers confront high input and infrastructure costs, which leaves them more financially leveraged than most of their colleagues. That economic burden has been felt by the entire cotton market, including the gins, cooperatives, marketers, cottonseed crushers, and the rural communities that depend upon their success.”

The sign-up period for the CGCS program runs from March 12, 2018, to May 11, 2018.

Under the program, which is administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA), cotton producers may receive a cost share payment, which is based on a producer’s 2016 cotton acres reported to FSA multiplied by 20 percent of the average ginning cost for each production region.

Perdue added, “I hope this will be a needed help as the rural cotton-growing communities stretching from the Southeastern U.S. to the San Joaquin Valley of California prepare to plant. This infusion gives them one last opportunity for assistance until their Farm Bill safety net becomes effective.”

CGCS payments are capped at $40,000 per producer. To qualify for the program, cotton producers must meet conservation compliance provisions, be actively engaged in farming and have adjusted gross incomes not exceeding $900,000. FSA will mail letters and pre-filled applications to all eligible cotton producers.

The program was established under the statutory authority of the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act.

To learn more about the CGCS program, visit www.fsa.usda.gov/cgcs or contact a local FSA county office. To find your local FSA county office, visit the USDA’s new website: https://www.farmers.gov/.

 

USDA Announces Commodity Credit Corporation Lending Rates for January

WASHINGTON, Jan. 2, 2018 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Commodity Credit Corporation today announced interest rates for January 2018.

The Commodity Credit Corporation borrowing rate-based charge for January is 1.625 percent, up from 1.500 percent in December.

The interest rate for crop year commodity loans less than one year disbursed during January is 2.625 percent, up from 2.500 percent in December.

Interest rates for Farm Storage Facility Loans approved for January are as follows, 1.875 percent with three-year loan terms, up from 1.750 percent in December; 2.125 percent with five-year loan terms, up from 2.000 percent in December; 2.250 percent with seven-year loan terms, unchanged from 2.250 percent in December; 2.375 percent with 10-year loan terms, unchanged from 2.375 percent in December and; 2.375 percent with 12-year loan terms, unchanged from 2.375 percent in December. The interest rate for 15-year Sugar Storage Facility Loans for January is 2.500 percent, unchanged from 2.500 percent in December.

Further program information is available from USDA Farm Service Agency’s Financial Management Division at 202-772-6041.